What does USCIS consider when determining if an applicant is of good moral character?

Follow

To be eligible for naturalization a successful candidate must be a person of good moral character. When reviewing your Form N-400, Application for Naturalization, USCIS will make that determination.

Examples of things that might demonstrate a lack of good moral character include but aren't limited to:

  • Any crime against a person with intent to harm.
  • Any crime against property or the Government that involves “fraud” or evil intent.
  • Two or more crimes for which the aggregate sentence was 5 years or more.
  • Violating any controlled substance law of the United States, any State, or any foreign country.
  • Habitual drunkenness.
  • Illegal gambling.
  • Prostitution.
  • Polygamy (marriage to more than one person at the same time).
  • Lying to gain immigration benefits.
  • Failing to pay court-ordered child support or alimony payments.
  • Confinement in jail, prison, or similar institution for which the total confinement was 180 days or more during the past 5 years (or 3 years if you are applying based on your marriage to a United States citizen).
  • Failing to complete any probation, parole, or suspended sentence before you apply for naturalization.
  • Terrorist acts.
  • Persecution of anyone because of race, religion, national origin, political opinion, or social group.

If you are concerned that your moral character may be in question due to even a minor incident, you should consult an immigration attorney before filing Form N-400.

Source: USCIS

Citizenship Resource Center
Find additional support articles and naturalization information in the Citizenship Resource Center
Naturalization Requirements  |  Citizenship Cost Calculator
What Happens After Filing N-400  |  How to Prepare for Citizenship Test
Citizenship Blog Articles

Have more questions? Submit a request

Comments

Powered by Zendesk